Discover Transcribed











































Bronson on a Boom

The direct cause of the town’s great boom is the advent of the Otter Creek Lumber Co., which operates  one of the largest saw mills in the state, giving employment to a large number of men. It has one of the most complete milling plants we ever saw. The company is just now putting in a planning apparatus, which covers nearly as much ground space as the main plant. The affairs of this concern are ably managed by F. A. Morgan, who comes as near being a ubiquitous overseer as one can imagine.-Bronson Times-Democrat-Source: Ocala Banner: 7-24-1903








































It is rumored that the Dunnellon Phosphate Company will soon begin construction of acid chambers at Port Inglis for the manufacture of acid phosphate for domestic and foreign use. The incoming cargoes of vessels will then comprise acids, while exports will be acid phosphate.

Collector Cubberly states that the Dunnellon Phosphate Company is employing a large number of men. The port is a scene of activity at all times and that many thousands of dollars are paid out each month.-Gainesville Sun- Source: Ocala Banner: 7-1-1904









































A petition asking that road from Lowe’s landing to Bronson and Crystal River road near Isham Stephens be extended eastward to county line was granted. Source: Levy Times: 1-14-1892











































At present the barges are cleaning out the channel from Port Inglis to Chambers’ Island, and are lifting and floating immense banks of rock and sand. Mr. Knott is pleased with his work and says it is interesting to watch the immense improvements that are being developed.

Clinton Burt is Engineer Knott’s foreman and assistant and they are getting along nicely. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 2-9-1900












































The Jacksonville Sun says in an editorial on Port Inglis that the Dunnellon Phosphate Company, cut a canal from the mines to the gulf, as an outlet for their product. In this the writer is way off, as sixteen miles of railroad intervenes between Rockwell, the headquarters of the company and Port Ingles. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 2-3-1905












































Rath & Cartier of Ludditigton, Mich., have purchased all the state lands in Levy County-20,000 acres. The Ellis, Young Co. have sold their tract of 42,000 acres to the Wyley Gobbet Co., of Atlanta, Ga. John A. Graham of Braidentown has bought 21, 591 acres of the Florida Southern Lands. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 7-17-1903











































A survey has recently been made for a railroad from Otter Creek through the fertile Gulf Hammock. This would mean the opening of one of the finest agricultural and trucking sections in the south. Source: Gainesville Sun: 5-3-1906











































We learn through Mr. J. E. Stevens, who is assisting Kibler Brothers in running their commissary at Port Inglis, that the dredging for the channel from Port Ingles to deep water on the Gulf of Mexico is about completed and ready for sea-going vessels to convey the phosphate from Dunnellon to foreign markets. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 6-28-1901

 







































The East Florida Telephone service has recently finished its lines to Bronson, Levy, county, where ten instruments have been installed. The service connects many of the most important towns and villages in the county and has proved a great advantage to the merchant and grower alike. Source: Gainesville Sun: 12-28-1905






































To Take Out Timber

A company of New York Capitalists have bought a large tract of land in Gulf Hammock, Levy county and intend to ship the timber out thru Port Ingles.  They will construct a railroad from a point on the Withlacoochee river between Inglis and Port Inglis ten or fifteen miles north into the heart of the hammock. The timber is mostly hardwood and will be rafted or carried in barges to the steamers out in the pool. Mr. J. R. Moorhead, of this city, will survey the route for the new road. He leaves tomorrow for Inglis to begin work. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 10-1-1913








































A bank was organized at Cedar Key Tuesday. An ice factory will follow and it is believed the government will locate the biological station there. Then watch the town grow. (Bronson Times-Democrat) Source: Ocala Evening News: 6-7-1912






























Port Inglis Led

Shipped More Hard Rock Last Year Than Any Other Florida Port

Port Inglis leads the list of ports from which Florida hard rock was exported in 1905. The shipments for last year of that mineral from all ports totaled, 570, 846 tons, distributed as follows: Port Inglis, 185, 211; Savannah, 180, 219; Fernandina, 115, 837; Port Tampa, 65, 767; Brunswick, 23, 812. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 1-25-1906








































It is rumored that the A. C. L. will change its proposed route north of Otter Creek, and instead of going by Chiefland, it will be deflected eastward and run thru the Levyville section and connect with the Cummer road at Double Sink. The matter is being watched with interest. Bronson Times-Democrat…Source: Ocala Evening Star: 7-26-1912

 














































Port Inglis Led

Shipped More Hard Rock Last Year Than Any Other Florida Port

Bronson is on a boom as there will be a millinery store put up and run by Mrs. M. T. Marsburn. Also, two more stores will be opened here and billiard and pool tables will be opened up. (Williston Advocate) Source: Ocala Evening Star: 9-19-1906













Inglis A Great Port

Experts For Year Ending June 30 Amounted To Nearly $1,700,000

The port of Port Inglis, which is located at the mouth of the Withlacoochee river, is rapidly gaining in importance of export, as large quantities of phosphate, lumber and naval stores are exported from that station annually to every country of the world.

Fred Cubberly, of Cedar Key, collector of customs for the ports of Cedar Key and Port Inglis, stated a day or two ago that the exports from Port Inglis amounted to $1,700,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, and that the shipments comprised phosphate, lumber and naval stores, the greater proportion being phosphate.

Port Inglis is naturally the outlet for a large and prolific phosphate field, including Dunnellon, Holder, Floral City and Withlacoochee river sections, which are among the richest phosphate fields in the world, mining and shipping millions of tons annually.

In speaking of the business transacted and clearing from the port for the year, Collector Cubberly stated that he only had a record of the exports and that the American or coast-wise shipping amounted to a great deal. The largest numbers of vessels ever entered were those shown on the books for the fiscal year just closing, and some of the vessels were tremendous to tonnage, one steamship measuring five hundred feet. Source: Gainesville Sun: 7-15-1907 

 




































Capt. R. A. Alfred of Port Inglis was in the city today, on his way for a business meeting in Chattanooga. He said there are three big ships in the pool off Port Inglis, taking on cargoes of 4000 or 5000 tons of phosphate each. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 10-9-1912





































Differences Cause Delay

Large Property Owners Along Proposed Extension of Coastline Stand In Their Own Light

Work will began without delay on the Atlantic Coast Line extension from Dunnellon to Otter Creek. N. G. Wade has the contract for building this piece of railroad, and it is to be completed by the latter part of the year. While this is gratifying news, we are reliably informed that the extension of this road from Otter Creek to the Suwannee river, which means a trunk line through the country north and south, will be indefinitely postponed if the route is not entirely changed. This detention of the work north of Otter Creek is caused by the failure of certain large land owners to co-operate with the road in conveying of right away previously agreed upon. Where the road crosses a man’s land who owns only a small farm the officials expect to pay for the right away, but a man who owns a large body of land will receive more benefit than he can confer, and the road expects his co-operation. This road will develop a fine section of country, and it is hoped the differences will be adjusted before the officials decide upon changing the route. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 3-4-1912









































New Development Planned For Bronson

Fairchild Bros. of Jacksonville have purchased 55 acres of land one-half miles north of the courthouse at Bronson.

The property was bought from W. J. Epperson, W. F. Osteen, W. R. Coulter and Miss Annie Sale.

The tract boarders the Seaboard railroad and State Road No. 5, and is high and dry, ideally situated for home sites in the development of a greater Bronson in a greater Levy county.

The purchasers of the property are well known developments, and it is authentically reported that the tract purchased will be cut up in sub-divisions and put on sale the first of the year 1926. Source: Gulf Coast News: 12-31-1925










































Williston To Have 15-Ton Ice Factory

Williston, Oct. 2-Williston will have a modern ice and cold storage plant. The city has been dependent for ice on outside firms for the last three months since the plant owned by the city was destroyed by fire.

R. L. Weaf, I. Henson and J. H. Stevens, will compose the company that is establishing the new plant. They already have placed the contract for a 15-ton plant. Source: Tampa Tribune: 10-3-1926











































To Take Out Timber

A company of New York capitalists have bought a large tract of land in Gulf Hammock, Levy county, and intend to ship the timber out thru Port Inglis. They will construct a railroad from a  point on the Withlacoochee river between Inglis and Port Inglis ten or fifteen miles north into the heart of the hammock. The timber is mostly hardwood, and will be rafted or carried in barges to the steamers out in the pool. Mr. J. R. Moorhead, of this city, will survey the route for the new road. He leaves tomorrow for Inglis to begin work. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 10-1-1913






































It is rumored that the A. C. L. will change its proposed route north of Otter Creek, and instead of going by Chiefland, it will be deflected eastword eastward and run thru the Levyville section and connect with the Cummer road at Double Sink. The matter is being watched with interest. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 7-26-1912









































Mr. S. W. Teague, on returning from a visit to Port Inglis, has a great deal to say of that new, but important phosphate port. The quantity of phosphate that will find an outlet at that point when Buttgenbach and the camps pour their output into that port will make the railroads look and feel sick at the freights they have lost by excessive rates. He went out to the mouth of the channel two miles west of Chamber’s Island and saw two tramp steamers taking on cargoes. Source: Ocala Evening Star: 3-5-1904
































Transcribed, Formatted and Submitted by Linda Flowers

This Page Created October 28, 2012
by Linda Flowers       Updated: 7-19-2017
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